Hunting for Wild Trout

Thanks to a tip from a reader of this blog, I found some open water at a small stream that holds wild brookies and browns. I had only a few hours and followed the sound of running water to find it. A stunning place.

I’m new to this stream and was struck by its beauty.

Riffles, small runs, and plunge pools abounded. And, even good lengths of bubble lines.

Upstream, it was even better. There were fallen trees and deep bends.

While there were no bumps, strikes, or hookups, I know I will be back when the weather is warmer. And, I’ve got to work on being stealthy on such shallow and clear waters. 
I was grateful to be outside and on some water after such a cold February. So, the hunt for wild trout continues.

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9 thoughts on “Hunting for Wild Trout

  1. Awesome post Jo! That small stream is beautiful, and surely holds some natives. Is it a tributary of a larger river though (not asking you to name it), because brown trout are not native to MA, so it seems likely to me that they are the result of some successful spawning by stocked trout, that found their way into a smaller stream, if they are really in there.

    Scott

    1. It's not a tributary to a larger river, but it is tributary to a lake which has other stocked tributaries. It also may have been stocked at some time in the past.

      They are definitely in there – Here's some pics of some browns I caught there earlier this winter: http://imgur.com/a/TyIWW

      Though they aren't native, there's a surprising number of streams with wild browns in MA.

  2. Nice looking stream, and I'm sure you will have better luck in the spring because it is extremely difficult this time of year. It is somewhat unfortunate that this stream has wild browns because most likely they will crowd out the brookies eventually because they are more aggressive. Although some anglers like them, wild browns are a nightmare for native brook trout.

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